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These featured pictures, as scheduled below, appeared as the picture of the day (POTD) on the English Wikipedia's Main Page in the last 30 days.

You can add an automatically updating POTD template to your user page using {{Pic of the day}} (version with blurb) or {{POTD}} (version without blurb). For instructions on how to make custom POTD layouts, see Wikipedia:Picture of the day.Purge server cache


April 12

Kennedy Space Center

The John F. Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, Florida, is NASA's primary launch center of human spaceflight. Launch operations for the Apollo, Skylab and Space Shuttle programs were carried out here. This photograph shows Space Shuttle Atlantis at Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex 39A in the evening before the launch of STS-129, a mission to the International Space Station in November 2009.

Photograph credit: NASA / Bill Ingalls; retouched by Bammesk


April 11

Ploughed Fields ('The Furrows')

Wheat Fields is a series of dozens of paintings by Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh. Ploughed Fields ('The Furrows'), painted in 1888, shows a field after ploughing with the earth lying in rough clods before the wheat has been sown. The picture is in the collection of the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam.

Painting credit: Vincent van Gogh


April 10

Red-billed streamertail

The red-billed streamertail (Trochilus polytmus) is the most common hummingbird in Jamaica, where it is the national bird. The female, shown here in hovering flight, lacks the red bill and long tail streamers of the male. The species's diet consists of nectar and small insects caught on the wing.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


April 9

BASE jumping

BASE jumping is the recreational sport of jumping from fixed objects, using a parachute to descend safely to the ground. The acronym stands for four categories of fixed objects from which the jumps can be made: buildings, antennae, spans, and earth (cliffs). In this photograph, a BASE jumper launches himself from the top of the Sapphire Tower in Istanbul, Turkey.

Photograph credit: Kontizas Dimitrios


April 8

The Hunting of the Snark

The Hunting of the Snark is a nonsense poem written by English writer Lewis Carroll between 1874 and 1876. The plot follows a crew of ten trying to hunt the Snark, which may turn out to be a highly dangerous Boojum. This original illustration by Henry Holiday accompanies the verse:

    "But oh, beamish nephew, beware of the day,
        If your Snark be a Boojum! For then
    You will softly and suddenly vanish away,
        And never be met with again!"

Illustration credit: Henry Holiday; restored by Adam Cuerden


April 7

Danaus genutia

Danaus genutia, the common tiger or striped tiger, is a species of brush-footed butterfly found in Sri Lanka, India, Myanmar, south-eastern Asia and Australia. It prefers areas of moderate to heavy rainfall, and typical habitats include scrubby jungle, deciduous forests and fallow land near habitations. The insect sequesters toxins from plants, and advertises its unpalatability by having prominent markings and striking colour patterns. This adult male common tiger, of the subspecies D. g. genutia, was photographed in Kerala, India.

Photograph credit: Charles James Sharp


April 6

Inauguration of John Tyler

The inauguration of John Tyler as the tenth president of the United States took place on April 6, 1841, in Washington, D.C., following the death of President William Henry Harrison two days earlier. This was the first non-scheduled, extraordinary presidential inauguration to take place in American history. Having received news of Harrison's death, Tyler traveled to Washington from his home in Williamsburg, Virginia by steamboat and train, the fastest means of conveyance then available, taking 21 hours.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


April 5

Eunice Pinney

Eunice Pinney (1770–1849) was an American folk artist active in the towns of Windsor and Simsbury, Connecticut. According to art historian Jean Lipman, a specialist in American folk painting, Pinney and her contemporary Mary Ann Willson are considered two of the earliest American painters to work in the medium of watercolor. This painting, entitled Lolotte et Werther, depicts a scene from Goethe's popular novel The Sorrows of Young Werther, and is in the collection of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

Painting credit: Eunice Pinney


April 4

Étienne Maurice Gérard

Étienne Maurice Gérard (4 April 1773 – 17 April 1852) was a French general, statesman and marshal of France. He served under a succession of French governments, including the monarchy of the Ancien Régime, the First Republic, the First Empire, the Bourbon Restoration, the July Monarchy, the Second Republic, and arguably the Second Empire, becoming prime minister briefly in 1834. This 1816 portrait of Gérard by Jacques-Louis David is in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

Painting credit: Jacques-Louis David


April 3

Zebra dove

The zebra dove (Geopelia striata) is a species of bird in the family Columbidae, native to southeastern Asia. Unlike other doves, zebra doves tend to forage alone or in pairs. Their diet consists mostly of grass and weed seeds, and they will also eat insects and other small invertebrates. They prefer to forage on bare ground, short grass or on roadsides, scurrying about with rodent-like movement. Their grey-and-brown barred plumage camouflages them well when they are on the ground. This zebra dove was photographed in the Chinese Garden in Singapore.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


April 2

The Entombment

The Entombment is an unfinished oil-on-panel painting of the burial of Jesus, now generally attributed to the Italian painter Michelangelo and dated to around 1500 or 1501. John the Evangelist may be the figure on the left, carrying Christ's body on strips of winding cloth up steps to the tomb, helped by one of the three Marys. The figure behind may be Joseph of Arimathea or Nicodemus, while another Mary sits on the ground at the bottom left. The unfinished area at bottom right was intended for a kneeling figure of the Virgin Mary. The painting is in the collection of the National Gallery in London.

Painting credit: Michelangelo (attributed)


April 1

My Wife's Lovers

My Wife's Lovers is an 1891 painting by Austrian artist Carl Kahler depicting forty-two Turkish Angora cats belonging to American millionaire Kate Birdsall Johnson. Not having painted cats before, Kahler spent three years studying cat poses and learning their habits. At the center of the painting sits Sultan, bought by Johnson during a trip to Paris. She lent the painting to the 1893 Chicago World's Fair and, following her death, it was acquired by Ernest Haquette for his Palace of Art Salon in San Francisco. Kahler died in the 1906 San Francisco earthquake, and the salon where the painting was hung was destroyed, but the picture survived. It was sold at Sotheby's in 2015 to a private buyer from California.

Painting credit: Carl Kahler


March 31

SOCATA TBM

The SOCATA TBM (now Daher TBM) is a family of high-performance single-engine turboprop business and utility light aircraft manufactured by Daher. This SOCATA TBM 900 was photographed in flight during the 2015 EAA AirVenture Oshkosh airshow in the U.S. state of Wisconsin. The aircraft features a Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-64 engine, and a five-blade carbon-fiber propeller, which increases performance and decreases cabin noise. In a passenger configuration, the pressurized cabin is typically fitted with highly finished interiors, featuring luxury materials such as leather and wood veneers.

Photograph credit: Michael Mainiero


March 30

Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh (30 March 1853 – 29 July 1890) was a Dutch Post-Impressionist painter and one of the most famous and influential figures in the history of Western art. In just over a decade, he created about 2,100 artworks, including around 860 oil paintings, most of which date from the last two years of his life. Van Gogh sold few paintings during his lifetime, and was contemporaneously considered a madman and a failure. However, he has attained widespread critical and popular acclaim since the early 20th century, and his works are among the world's most expensive paintings. Van Gogh produced this oil-on-canvas self-portrait in September 1889. One of his several self-portraits, it may have been his last, produced shortly before he left Saint-Rémy-de-Provence in southern France. The work is now in the collection of the Musée d'Orsay in Paris.

Painting credit: Vincent van Gogh


March 29

Haliotis laevigata

Haliotis laevigata is a species of marine mollusc in the family Haliotidae, endemic to Tasmania and the southern and western coasts of Australia. This picture shows five views of a green H. laevigata shell, 7.5 centimetres (3.0 in) in length. The holes in the shell, characteristic of abalones, are respiratory apertures for venting water from the gills and for releasing sperm and eggs into the water column.

Photograph credit: H. Zell


March 28

Birds' Head Haggadah

The Birds' Head Haggadah is the oldest surviving illuminated manuscript of the Haggadah, a ritual text recounting the story of Passover, the liberation of the Israelites from slavery in ancient Egypt, recited by participants at a Seder. The Ashkenazi Jewish manuscript was produced in the Upper Rhine region of Southern Germany in the early 14th century, with the text copied by a scribe named Menahem. All Jewish men, women, and children depicted in the manuscript have human bodies with the faces and beaks of birds, while non-Jewish and non-human faces are blank or blurred. Numerous theories have been advanced to explain the unusual iconography, usually tied to Jewish aniconism. The manuscript was owned by the German politician Ludwig Marum in the 20th century, and is now in the possession of the Israel Museum in Jerusalem, where it is on permanent exhibition.

Manuscript credit: Menahem; photographed by the Israel Museum


March 27

Chromostereopsis

Chromostereopsis is a visual illusion in which the impression of depth is conveyed in two-dimensional color images. This 1564 stained-glass window, in the Bielsko-Biała Museum and Castle in Poland, exhibits this effect, with contrasting depth perception in the red and blue areas. The window, an example of Standesscheibe, depicts the coat of arms of Unterwalden, a canton of the Old Swiss Confederacy.

Stained-glass credit: unknown; photographed by Jan Mehlich


March 26

Dvenadsat Apostolov

Dvenadsat Apostolov was a pre-dreadnought battleship built for the Imperial Russian Navy, the sole ship of her class. Launched in 1890, she entered service with the Black Sea Fleet in 1893, taking part in the failed attempt to recapture the mutinous battleship Potemkin in 1905. Decommissioned and disarmed in 1911, she was used as a stand-in for the title ship during the 1925 filming of the Battleship Potemkin before finally being scrapped in 1931.

Lithograph credit: Stadler and Pattinot, after Vasily Ignatius; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 25

Le mage

Le mage is an opera in five acts by Jules Massenet to a French libretto by Jean Richepin. First performed at the Paris Opera in 1891, it has rarely been performed since its premiere run of 31 performances, and is one of Massenet's least-known operas. A rare complete concert performance took place at the Massenet Festival in Saint-Étienne in 2012. This poster by Alfredo Edel was produced for the opera's premiere on 16 March 1891.

Poster credit: Alfredo Leonardo Edel; restored by Adam Cuerden


March 24

Noisy pitta

The noisy pitta (Pitta versicolor) is a species of bird in the pitta family, Pittidae, found in eastern Australia and southern New Guinea, where it mainly occurs in rainforest, but sometimes in drier woodland and scrub. It is a shy bird, and its distinctive call is heard more often than the bird is seen. It forages on the forest floor, bobbing its head up and down and flicking its tail, searching for insects, woodlice, snails and other invertebrates. Its diet includes some fruit, and it cracks open the shells of molluscs on an anvil. This noisy pitta was photographed in Kembla Heights, New South Wales.

Photograph credit: John Harrison


March 23

Roger B. Chaffee

Roger B. Chaffee (1935–1967) was an American naval officer and aviator, aeronautical engineer, and NASA astronaut. He was to have been a pilot on Apollo 1, but died in a fire on January 27, 1967, with fellow astronauts Gus Grissom and Ed White, during a pre-launch test for the mission. He was posthumously awarded the Congressional Space Medal of Honor. This photograph shows Chaffee at a console at NASA's Mission Control Center in Houston during the Gemini 3 mission on March 23, 1965.

Photograph credit: NASA


March 22

Abolhassan Banisadr

Abolhassan Banisadr (born 22 March 1933) is an Iranian politician. He was the first president of Iran after the 1979 Iranian Revolution abolished the Pahlavi dynasty, serving from 4 February 1980 until his impeachment by the Islamic Consultative Assembly, the Iranian parliament, on 20 June 1981. Prior to his presidency, he was the Minister of Foreign Affairs in the interim government. Following Banisadr's exile in 1981, he has resided for many years in France, where he co-founded the National Council of Resistance of Iran.

Photograph credit: Christoph Braun


March 21

Vision of St. John on Patmos

The Vision of St. John on Patmos is a series of frescoes painted between 1520 and 1522 by the Italian Renaissance artist Antonio da Correggio. Depicting a scene from the Book of Revelation, it occupies the interior of the dome, and the surrounding pendentives, of the Benedictine church of San Giovanni Evangelista in Parma, Italy.

Painting credit: Antonio da Correggio; photographed by Livioandronico2013


March 20

Emily Carr

Emily Carr (1871–1945) was a Canadian artist and writer, and one of the first painters in Canada to adopt a Modernist and Post-Impressionist style. She received widespread recognition for her work when she changed from Aboriginal themes to landscapes. This 1939 painting by Carr, entitled Odds and Ends, depicts cleared land and tree stumps, revealing the impact of deforestation on British Columbia, and is now held by the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria.

Painting credit: Emily Carr


March 19

Francis B. Spinola

Francis B. Spinola (March 19, 1821 – April 14, 1891) was an American politician and military leader of Portuguese and Irish ancestry. He is considered by some authorities as the first Italian American to be elected to the United States House of Representatives, serving as a representative from New York between 1887 and 1891. Spinola also served as a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


March 18

Presidencies of Grover Cleveland

Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was an American politician and lawyer who was the 22nd and 24th president of the United States, the only president in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office (1885–1889 and 1893–1897). His victory in the 1884 presidential election made him the first successful Democratic nominee since the start of the Civil War. He won praise for his honesty, self-reliance, integrity, and commitment to the principles of classical liberalism, and was renowned for fighting political corruption, patronage, and bossism.

Credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


March 17

Eutropis macularia

Eutropis macularia, the bronze grass skink, is a species of lizard in the skink family, Scincidae, native to South and Southeast Asia. It lives in both deciduous and evergreen forests, in plantations, in grasslands, and in rocky areas with scattered trees. The species is active in both the day and the night, feeding on insects and other invertebrates. This bronze grass skink was photographed on a tree trunk on the island of Don Det in Laos.

Photograph credit: Basile Morin


March 16

Saint Petersburg

Saint Petersburg, the second-largest city in Russia, is situated at the head of the Gulf of Finland on the Baltic Sea. This photograph shows the eastern end of Vasilyevsky Island, known as the spit, surrounded by the river Neva. The Old Saint Petersburg Stock Exchange and Rostral Columns, built in the Greek Revival style in the first decade of the nineteenth century, are visible in the centre.

Photograph credit: Alexander Savin


March 15

Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845) was an American soldier and statesman who served as the seventh president of the United States from 1829 to 1837. He has been widely revered in the United States as an advocate for democracy and the common man, but many of his actions proved divisive, garnering both fervent support and strong opposition from different sectors of society. His reputation has suffered since the 1970s, largely due to his pivotal role in the forcible removal of Native Americans from their ancestral homelands; however, surveys of historians and scholars have ranked Jackson favorably among U.S. presidents.

Engraving credit: Bureau of Engraving and Printing; restored by Andrew Shiva


March 14

Pope Pius VII

Pope Pius VII (1742–1823) was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 14 March 1800 to his death in 1823. In this 1819 portrait by Thomas Lawrence, he is shown seated on the papal throne, wearing a zucchetto on his head, a red mozzetta, a lace-trimmed rochet, a white cassock and red papal slippers. The painting is in the Royal Collection of the British royal family, and hangs in the Waterloo Chamber in Windsor Castle.

Painting credit: Thomas Lawrence


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