Pittsburgh Pirates
2020 Pittsburgh Pirates season
Established in 1882
Pittsburgh Pirates logo 2014.svgPittsburgh Pirates Cap Insignia.svg
Team logoCap insignia
Major league affiliations
Current uniform
MLB-NLC-PIT-Uniforms.png
Retired numbers
Colors
  • Black, gold, white[1][2][3]
                  
Name
  • Pittsburgh Pirates (1891–present)
  • Pittsburgh Alleghenys (1887–1890)
  • Allegheny (1882–1886)
Other nicknames
  • The Bucs, The Buccos, The Black and Gold
Ballpark
Major league titles
World Series titles (5)
NL Pennants (9)
Central Division titles (0)None
East Division titles (9)
Wild card berths (3)
Front office
Owner(s)Robert Nutting
ManagerDerek Shelton
General ManagerBen Cherington
President of Baseball OperationsTravis Williams

The Pittsburgh Pirates are an American professional baseball team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. They compete in Major League Baseball (MLB) as a member club of the National League (NL) Central division. Founded in 1881 under the name Pittsburgh Allegheny, the franchise has won five World Series championships. The Pirates are also often referred to as the "Bucs" or the "Buccos" (derived from buccaneer, a synonym for pirate). The team plays its home games at PNC Park, its home since 2001. The Pirates previously played at Forbes Field from 1909-1970 and at Three Rivers Stadium, so named because of its location near the confluence of the Allegheny, Monongahela, and Ohio rivers, from 1970-2000.

The franchise joined the NL in its eighth season in 1887 and was competitive from its early years, winning three NL titles from 1901 to 1903, playing in the inaugural World Series in 1903 and winning their first World Series in 1909 behind Honus Wagner. The Pirates have had many ups and downs during their long history, most famously winning the 1960 World Series against the New York Yankees on a series-winning walk-off home run by Bill Mazeroski, the only time that Game 7 of the World Series has ever ended with a home run. They also won the 1971 World Series, led by the talent of Roberto Clemente, and the 1979 World Series under the slogan "We Are Family", led by "Pops" Willie Stargell.

After a run of regular-season success in the early 1990s (winning three straight NL East Division titles), the Pirates struggled mightily over the following 20 years, with 20 consecutive losing seasons from 1993 to 2012 — the longest such streak in American professional sports history[4] — before posting a winning record in 2013 of 94–68, qualifying them for the NL Wild Card. They advanced to the NL Division Series round, where they lost in 5 games to the St. Louis Cardinals. The Pirates made the playoffs in both 2014 and 2015, losing in the Wild Card Game both times. The Pirates currently have the longest World Series appearance drought in Major League Baseball among any team with at least one appearance,[5] their most recent showing being their victory in the 1979 World Series. From 1882 to 2018, the Pirates have an overall record of 10,476–10,312 (a .504 winning 'percentage').[6]

Franchise history

Professional baseball in the Pittsburgh area began in 1876 with the organization of the Allegheny Base Ball Club, an independent (non-league) club based in a then-separate city called Allegheny City, across the Allegheny River from Pittsburgh. The team joined the minor league International Association in 1877, only to fold the following season.[7] On October 15, 1881, Denny McKnight held a meeting at Pittsburgh's St. Clair Hotel to organize a new Allegheny club,[8] which began play in 1882 as a founding member of the American Association. Chartered as the Allegheny Base Ball Club of Pittsburgh,[9] the team was listed as "Allegheny" in the standings, and was sometimes called the "Alleghenys" (rarely the "Alleghenies") in that era's custom of referring to a team by its pluralized city or club name. After five mediocre seasons in the A.A., Pittsburgh became the first A.A. team to switch to the older National League in 1887. At the time, William A. Nimick was club president and Horace Phillips manager.[10]

Before the 1890 season, nearly all of the Alleghenys' best players bolted to the Players' League's Pittsburgh Burghers. The Players' League collapsed after the season, and the players were allowed to go back to their old clubs. However, the Alleghenys also scooped up highly regarded second baseman Lou Bierbauer, who had previously played with the AA's Philadelphia Athletics. Although the Athletics had failed to include Bierbauer on their reserve list, they loudly protested the Alleghenys' move. In an official complaint, an AA official claimed the Alleghenys' signing of Bierbauer was "piratical".[11] This incident (which is discussed at some length in The Beer and Whisky League, by David Nemec, 1994) quickly accelerated into a schism between the leagues that contributed to the demise of the A.A. Although the Alleghenys were never found guilty of wrongdoing, they made sport of being denounced for being "piratical" by renaming themselves "the Pirates" for the 1891 season.[12] The nickname was first acknowledged on the team's uniforms in 1912.

The Pirates were a strong team in the early 1900s, winning National League pennants from 1901–1903 and taking their first World Series title in 1909. They again won the NL in 1925 and 1927 and the World Series in 1925. After a slow period, they returned to dominance and won the 1960 World Series, 1971 World Series and 1979 World Series. They won Eastern Division titles from 1990–1992 but did not return to the postseason again until 2013.

In 2013 the Pirates became the seventh MLB team to reach 10,000 all-time wins.[13] On Opening Day 2015 the Pirates' loss was the team's 10,000th[14] making the Pirates the fourth MLB team to achieve this distinction, following the Philadelphia Phillies, Atlanta Braves, and Chicago Cubs.[15] Later in 2015 they won their 10,000th game as a member of the National League. They entered the playoffs as a Wild Card team in 2013, 2014, and 2015, but lost in the NLDS once and lost the Wild Card game twice, and have not returned to the playoffs since 2015.

Rivalries

Historical

Philadelphia Phillies

The rivalry between the Philadelphia Phillies and the Pirates was considered by some to be one of the best rivalries in the National League.[16][17][18] The rivalry started when the Pittsburgh Pirates entered the NL in 1887, four years after the Phillies.[19]

The Phillies and the Pirates had remained together after the National League split into two divisions in 1969. During the period of two-division play (1969–1993), the two National League East division rivals won the two highest numbers of division championships, reigning almost exclusively as NL East champions in the 1970s and again in the early 1990s.[18][20][21] the Pirates nine, the Phillies six; together, the two teams' 15 championships accounted for more than half of the 25 NL East championships during that span.[20]

After the Pirates moved to the National League Central in 1994, the teams face each other only in two series each year and the rivalry has diminished.[17][18] However, many fans, especially older ones, retain their dislike for the other team, with regional differences between Eastern and Western Pennsylvania still fueling the rivalry.[22]

Within the Central Division

The Pirates have long-standing, albeit sometimes dormant, rivalries with their fellow NL Central Division teams, including the Cincinnati Reds, St. Louis Cardinals, Milwaukee Brewers (with The Sausage incident and the 'You can steal first' game) and the Chicago Cubs (with the Homer in the Gloamin' and most recently, the 2015 NL Wild Card game). The intensity of the rivalries often depend upon the competitiveness of the teams involved during that season.

Roster

Pittsburgh Pirates 2020 spring training roster
40-man roster Non-roster invitees Coaches/Other

Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders


Pitchers

Catchers

Infielders

Outfielders


Manager

Coaches

60-day injured list

Restricted list

40 active, 1 inactive, 22 non-roster invitees

Injury icon 2.svg 7-, 10-, or 15-day injured list
* Not on active roster
Suspended list
Roster, coaches, and NRIs updated February 13, 2020
Transactions Depth Chart
All MLB rosters

Players

Baseball Hall of Fame

Pittsburgh Pirates Hall of Famers
Affiliation according to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum
Pittsburgh Pirates

Jake Beckley *
Bert Blyleven
Jim Bunning
Max Carey *
Jack Chesbro
Fred Clarke *
Roberto Clemente *
Joe Cronin

Kiki Cuyler
Barney Dreyfuss *
Frankie Frisch
Pud Galvin
Goose Gossage
Hank Greenberg
Burleigh Grimes
Ned Hanlon
Billy Herman

Waite Hoyt
Joe Kelley
George Kelly
Ralph Kiner *
Chuck Klein
Freddie Lindstrom
Al López
Connie Mack
Heinie Manush

Rabbit Maranville
Bill Mazeroski *
Bill McKechnie
Hank O'Day
Branch Rickey
Billy Southworth
Willie Stargell *
Casey Stengel
Pie Traynor *

Dazzy Vance
Arky Vaughan *
Rube Waddell
Honus Wagner *
Lloyd Waner *
Paul Waner *
Deacon White
Vic Willis

  • Players and managers listed in bold are depicted on their Hall of Fame plaques wearing a Pirates or Alleghenys cap insignia.
  • * Pittsburgh Pirates listed as primary team according to the Hall of Fame

Ford C. Frick Award recipients

Pittsburgh Pirates Ford C. Frick Award recipients
Affiliation according to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum

Milo Hamilton

Al Helfer

Bob Prince

  • Names in bold received the award based primarily on their work as broadcasters for the Pirates.

Team captains